MEN may COME, MEN may GO………………

THE BROOK

The Brook is the story of a creek. It begins its journey high in the mountains and goes past valleys, farms encountering birds, fish, ferns, people on its way until it joins the river. Written in 1886, it is a gem of reading, beautiful and remarkable for its resonant words that conjure corresponding sounds and images to the mind.

COOT

I come from haunts of coot and hern,
   I make a sudden sally
And sparkle out among the fern,
   To bicker down a valley.

HERN/HERON
BY HILLS I HURRY DOWN

By thirty hills I hurry down,
   Or slip between the ridges,
By twenty thorpes, a little town,
   And half a hundred bridges.

THE BRIDGES

Till last by Philip’s farm I flow
   To join the brimming river,
For men may come and men may go,
   But I go on for ever.

I CHATTER OVER STONY WAYS

I chatter over stony ways,
   In little sharps and trebles,
I bubble into eddying bays,
   I babble on the pebbles.

With many a curve my banks I fret
   By many a field and fallow,
And many a fairy foreland set
   With willow-weed and mallow.

WITH MANY A CURVE (Pic courtesy Himanshu Tyagi)

I chatter, chatter, as I flow
   To join the brimming river,
For men may come and men may go,
   But I go on for ever.

GRAYLING

I wind about, and in and out,
   With here a blossom sailing,
And here and there a lusty trout,
   And here and there a grayling,

TROUT

And here and there a foamy flake
   Upon me, as I travel
With many a silvery waterbreak
   Above the golden gravel,

FOAMY FLAKES

And draw them all along, and flow
   To join the brimming river
For men may come and men may go,
   But I go on for ever.

FORGET ME NOT

I steal by lawns and grassy plots,
   I slide by hazel covers;
I move the sweet forget-me-nots
   That grow for happy lovers.

FORGET ME NOT’s

I slip, I slide, I gloom, I glance,
   Among my skimming swallows;
I make the netted sunbeam dance
   Against my sandy shallows.

SWALLOW SKIMMING THE WATERS

I murmur under moon and stars
   In brambly wildernesses;
I linger by my shingly bars;
   I loiter round my cresses;

UNDER STARS

And out again I curve and flow
   To join the brimming river,
For men may come and men may go,
   But I go on for ever.

GO ON FOR EVER

ALFRED LORD TENNYSON

LORD TENNYSON

Tennyson was a British poet. He lived from 6th August, 1809 to 6th October, 1892. He wrote this poem in 1886. Picture above has been borrowed from The British Museum. The poem above, moving lightly, has an underlying sobering refrain of the transience of humans in contrast to the permanence of nature.

TENNYSON SAID:

ON PERSEVERANCE

To Strive, To Seek and not to Yield

ON NEW YEAR

Ring out the old, ring in the new,

Ring, happy bells, across the snow:

The year is going, let him go;

Ring out the false, ring in the true.

ON BREAKING OUT

The Shell must break

Before the Bird can fly

ON LOVE

A man had given all other bliss,

And all his worldly worth for this

To waste his whole heart in one kiss

Upon her perfect lips.

ON BRAVERY

Theirs not to make reply,

Theirs not to reason why,

Theirs but to do and die.

ON DISTRACTION

If you don’t concentrate on what you are doing

then

the thing that you are doing is not what you are thinking.

LOVE & ETERNITY

If I had a flower for every time I thought of you…

I could walk through my garden forever.

FOR THE INFORMATION SOCIETY

Knowledge comes but wisdom lingers

SMILE A WHILE

Question: Why was John Keats always hounded by creditors?
Answer: Because he Ode so much.

You might like to visit: http://www.allanwolf.com/poetry-jokes/ to which site, the above joke is ‘ode’.

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